Space is full of junk because private companies keep launching satellites

Since the launch of Sputnik 1 in 1957, the lower orbit around the Earth has become an increasingly congested environment with more than 2,200 satellite launches to date. Those satellites – along with launch vehicle components and debris from mechanical disintegration, collisions, and explosions – now fill this region with a “fog” of space debris. And it’s getting busier. In the last few weeks, SpaceX has launched 60 new satellites as part of its Starlink program. This brings the total to currently around 400 Starlink satellites in low Earth orbit as part of a program that aims to bring cheap,… This story continues at The Next Web...
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UK getting 200 mile route to test self-driving vehicles on public roads

A mobility consortium in the UK has begun work on a real-world test route for self-driving vehicles as part of local government trials exploring the future of mobility tech. The project, led by Midlands Future Mobility, is building the route to include 300 km (190 miles) of roads around the University of Warwick, Coventry, Solihull, and central Birmingham, Coventry Live reports. [Read: Engineer finds Tesla Model 3 is secretly equipped with hardware for powering homes] It should give autonomous vehicles a mix of urban, rural, suburban, and motorway roads to navigate. It will also take in important transport hubs including… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Technology start-ups that fail fast succeed faster

Failure rates of new technology-based companies are shockingly high. It is estimated that 75% of technology start-ups do not generate profits. Other data suggest upwards of 90% of new technology enterprises completely fail. However, some failures of products or technologies have been positive and lead to success. It took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts before he succeeded with his lightbulb design. Although learning from failure has been described as critical to the success of technology-based start-ups, there is little existing research that supports this claim. Strategic management scholars have described and found support for a number of organizational philosophies, behaviors,… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Pardon the Intrusion #18: Marcus Hutchins, the ransomware hero

Subscribe to this bi-weekly newsletter here! Welcome to the latest edition of Pardon The Intrusion, TNW’s bi-weekly newsletter in which we explore the wild world of security. Two contrasting developments unfolded in the US and Germany last week. While the US Senate voted to reauthorize the USA Freedom Act, allowing law enforcement to collect Americans’ browsing and internet search records without a warrant, Germany’s constitutional court ruled that the country’s intelligence agency, the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND), can no longer spy on the world’s internet traffic without any restrictions. The bill takes aim at Section 215, a sweeping surveillance law in the… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Research: political hashtags make online news discussions more extreme

Whether you’re a conservative or a liberal, you have most likely come across a political hashtag in an article, a tweet or a personal story shared on Facebook. A hashtag is a functional tag widely used in search engines and social networking services that allow people to search for content that falls under the word or phrase, followed by the # sign. First popularized by Twitter in 2009, the use of hashtags has become widespread. Nearly anything political with the intent of attracting a wide audience is now branded with a catchy hashtag. Take for example, election campaigns (#MAGA), social… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Algorithms associating appearance with criminality have a dark past

‘Phrenology’ has an old-fashioned ring to it. It sounds like it belongs in a history book, filed somewhere between bloodletting and velocipedes. We’d like to think that judging people’s worth based on the size and shape of their skull is a practice that’s well behind us. However, phrenology is once again rearing its lumpy head. In recent years, machine-learning algorithms have promised governments and private companies the power to glean all sorts of information from people’s appearance. Several startups now claim to be able to use artificial intelligence (AI) to help employers detect the personality traits of job candidates based… This story continues at The Next Web...
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We’ve got 10 super-useful apps with lifetime subscription offers on sale right now 

TLDR: From security to productivity to incredibly helpful, check out Memorial Day deals on 10 of the best software and app offers from TNW Deals. Not to take away from the true meaning of Memorial Day, but the unofficial start to the summer season has become — like most American holidays — a great time to find some awesome deals. Since many of us still aren’t ranging too far away from our homes just yet, we pulled together 10 of the best apps and software packages on sale this weekend, all with lifetime subscriptions, into one place. No going out… This story continues at The Next Web...
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A designer’s guide to creating effective dashboards

Sprint: Did you know we have an online conference about product design coming up? SPRINT will cover how designers and product owners can stay ahead of the curve in these unprecedented times. Dashboards are a unique and powerful way to present data-based intelligence using data visualization techniques that display relevant, actionable data as well as track stats and key performance indicators (KPIs). Dashboards should present this data in a quick, easy-to-scan format with the most relevant information understandable at a glance. The term was born from the traditional automobile dashboard, and they have evolved to serve the same function in… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Coding is a language — and that’s why kids can learn it faster than you

Across the world, the conversion of information into a digital format – also called “digitalization” – has increased productivity in the public and private sectors. As a result, virtually every country in the world is working towards a digital economy. As this new economy evolves, special skills like computer programming are needed. This is like a language of numbers, known as code, which allows people to write instructions that are executed by computers. The goal is to create something: from a web page to an image, to a piece of software. Early coding languages emerged in the 1940s. These were… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Everything you need to know about neuromorphic computing

In July, a group of artificial intelligence researchers showcased a self-driving bicycle that could navigate around obstacles, follow a person, and respond to voice commands. While the self-driving bike itself was of little use, the AI technology behind it was remarkable. Powering the bicycle was a neuromorphic chip, a special kind of AI computer. Neuromorphic computing is not new. In fact, it was first proposed in the 1980s. But recent developments in the artificial intelligence industry have renewed interest in neuromorphic computers. The growing popularity of deep learning and neural networks has spurred a race to develop AI hardware specialized for neural… This story continues at The Next Web...
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