Facebook has been barely impacted by big advertisers’ boycott — here’s why

Facebook has faced a lot of criticism over the years for failing to moderate hate speech. Its policies have come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks thanks to the Stop Hate for Profit campaign. Started by civil rights groups in the US, the campaign has led to some of Facebook’s biggest customers pulling their ads from the social media platform for the month of July. As much as 99% of Facebook’s US$70.7 billion (£55 billion) in revenues come through advertising and the boycott initially resulted in an 8% knock to Facebook’s market value (amounting to US$72 billion). Yet, even with… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook...
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Here’s what makes the perfect ‘cursed image’

This week was Upvote Everything Day on Imgur (the procrastination black hole I spend way too much time on). So instead of the usual feel good fluff and pandering cute pet pics, the front page was crowded with GIFs of women giving birth to candy abominations and video clips of lederhosen-clad German pop-folk music weirdos. Just like god intended. However, it also usually brings to the fore one of my all time favorite types of content (or at least the one I mildly obsess over), cursed images. I have a horrid fascination with cursed images. What interests me is why… This story continues at The Next Web...
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Huawei and Bytedance are prime examples of a new regional approach to trade

Huawei and TikTok were two of the most successful examples of globalization. Huawei started as a small private firm in 1987 and has risen in just over 30 years to become a world champion in telecommunications. TikTok has succeeded over a much shorter time period. Having only launched in 2016, the video-sharing service is now the fourth most popular app in the world and has achieved 1.9 billion downloads worldwide. Both of these Chinese companies are now at the mercy of a widening geopolitical divide. The US has led an increasingly successful campaign to eliminate Huawei from the global market… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Huawei...
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Congress fumbles through antitrust hearing with big tech CEOs

The four horseman of the techpocalypse – the CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google – joined the US House of Representatives today for an antitrust hearing. We watched every second of the more than five and a half hours of Congress’ grilling of some of the richest men in the world so you wouldn’t have to. Let’s start with the ending. House Antitrust Committee Chairman David Cicilline closed today’s hearing with the following statement: This hearing has made one fact clear to me: these companies as they exist today have monopoly power. Some need to be broken up, all… This story continues at The Next Web...
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How to change your name on Facebook, Twitter, and other social media platforms

You’ve made your decision: you want to change your username on your social media platform of choice. You’ve selected your new handle and want to dispense with the old one. That’s great — change is as good as a rest, after all. But how do you actually do it? There are any number of reasons for changing your username on accounts. Maybe you’ve changed your name and want your socials to reflect that. Maybe you want to change your personal accounts to something more branded and business related. Maybe you’re just flat-out embarrassed by your handle Unfortunately, some platforms don’t… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook,Twitter...
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Facebook built a powerful AI model to simulate entire social media networks in action

When it comes to live-fire high-wire acts in the tech industry, there can be few endeavors more daunting than executing a security update to a software platform hosting more than 2.6 billion users. But that’s exactly what Facebook does every time it rolls out an update. Sure, it mitigates the potential for terror by making the changes in batches and conducting an incredible amount of internal testing. But at the end of the day, you never know precisely how any given change could upset the delicate user balance that keeps Facebook on people’s screens. Lucky for Facebook, the company’s AI… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook...
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How Twitter’s biggest ever hack exposed serious threats to democracy

In case 2020 wasn’t dystopian enough, hackers on July 15 hijacked the Twitter accounts of former President Barack Obama, presidential hopeful Joe Biden, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Kim Kardashian, and Apple, among others. Each hijacked account posted a similar fake message. The high-profile individual or company wanted to philanthropically give back to the community during COVID-19 and would double any donations made to a bitcoin wallet, identical messages said. The donations followed. The hack on the surface may appear to be a run-of-the-mill financial scam. But the breach has chilling implications for democracy. Serious political implications As a scholar of… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Twitter...
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How to turn off political ads on Facebook

Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff. It’s election year in the US, which means you’re probably going to see lots of political ads. While some social media platforms have banned them — such as Twitter — Facebook has yet to do so. But luckily, as of this June, it does offer an option to shut them off yourself. Facebook‘s history with political ads, and politics in general, is a complicated and unpleasant one. Suffice to say the platform’s infamous for hosting… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook...
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Here’s how Facebook found disinformation networks tied to Bolsonaro and Roger Stone

Facebook has taken down disinformation networks linked to Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and disgraced former Trump adviser Roger Stone, the company announced yesterday. The network connected to Bolsonaro was “involved in coordinated inauthentic behavior in Brazil” that sought to influence elections and denigrate opponents of the government, according to Facebook. Most recently, the accounts have echoed Bolsonaro’s claims that the coronavirus pandemic has been exaggerated — which even a positive test for COVID-19 has failed to curb. Their network used duplicate and fake accounts to “create fictitious personas posing as reporters, post content, and manage Pages masquerading as news outlets,” according to… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Facebook...
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The science behind why everyone is angry on Twitter on Mondays

The link between hot weather and aggressive crime is well established. But can the same be said for online aggression, such as angry tweets? And is online anger a predictor of assaults? Our study just published suggests the answer is a clear “no.” We found angry tweet counts actually increased in cooler weather. And as daily maximum temperatures rose, angry tweet counts decreased. We also found the incidence of angry tweets is highest on Mondays, and perhaps unsurprisingly, angry Twitter posts are most prevalent after big news events such as a leadership spill. This is the first study to compare… This story continues at The Next Web...
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